Java Convert String to Integer

Java Convert String to Integer

Introduction

Converting a String to an int, or its respective wrapper class Integer, is a common and simple operation. The same goes for the other way around, converting a Integer to String.

There are multiple ways to achieve this simple conversion using methods built-in to the JDK.

Converting String to Integer

For converting String to Integer or int, there are four built-in approaches. The wrapper class Integer provides a few methods specifically for this use - parseInt(), valueOf() and decode(), although we can also use its constructor and pass a String into it.

These three methods have different return types:

  • parseInt()- returns primitive int.
  • valueOf() - returns a new or cached instance of Integer
  • decode() - returns a new or cached instance of Integer

That being said, it's valid to raise a question:

"What's the difference between valueOf() and decode() then?

The difference is that decode() also accepts other number representations, other than regular decimal - hex digits, octal digits, etc.

Note: It's better practice to instantiate an Integer with the help of the valueOf() method rather than relying on the constructor. This is because the valueOf() method will return a cached copy for any value between -128 and 127 inclusive, and by doing so will reduce the memory footprint.

Integer.parseInt()

The parseInt() method ships in two flavors:

  • parseInt(String s) - Accepting the String we'd like to parse
  • parseInt(String s, int radix) - Accepting the String as well as the base of the numeration system

The parseInt() method converts the input String into a primitive int and throws a NumberFormatException if the String cannot be converted:

String string1 = "100";
String string2 = "100";
String string3 = "Google";
String string4 = "20";

int number1 = Integer.parseInt(string1);
int number2 = Integer.parseInt(string2, 16); 
int number3 = Integer.parseInt(string3, 32); 
int number4 = Integer.parseInt(string4, 8); 

System.out.println("Parsing String \"" + string1 + "\": " + number1);
System.out.println("Parsing String \"" + string2 + "\" in base 16: " + number2);
System.out.println("Parsing String \"" + string3 + "\" in base 32: " + number3);
System.out.println("Parsing String \"" + string4 + "\" in base 8: " + number4);

Running this piece of code will yield:

Parsing String "100": 100
Parsing String "100" in base 16: 256
Parsing String "Google" in base 32: 562840238
Parsing String "20" in base 8: 16

Integer.valueOf()

The valueOf() ships in three flavors:

  • valueOf(String s) - Accepts a String and parses it into an Integer
  • valueOf(int i) - Accepts an int and parses it into an Integer
  • valueOf(String s, int radix) - Accepts a String and returns an Integer representing the value and then parses it with the given base

The valueOf() method, unlike the parseInt() method, returns an Integer instead of a primitive int and also throws a NumberFormatException if the String cannot be converted properly and only accepts decimal numbers:

int i = 10;
String string1 = "100";
String string2 = "100";
String string3 = "Google";
String string4 = "20";

int number1 = Integer.valueOf(i);
int number2 = Integer.valueOf(string1); 
int number3 = Integer.valueOf(string3, 32); 
int number4 = Integer.valueOf(string4, 8); 

System.out.println("Parsing int " + i + ": " + number1);
System.out.println("Parsing String \"" + string1 + "\": " + number2);
System.out.println("Parsing String \"" + string3 + "\" in base 32: " + number3);
System.out.println("Parsing String \"" + string4 + "\" in base 8: " + number4);

Running this piece of code will yield:

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Parsing int 10: 10
Parsing String "100": 100
Parsing String "Google" in base 32: 562840238
Parsing String "20" in base 8: 16

Integer.decode()

The decode() method accepts a single parameter and comes in one flavor:

  • decode(String s) - Accepts a String and decodes it into an Integer

The decode() method accepts decimal, hexadecimal and octal numbers, but doesn't support binary:

String string1 = "100";
String string2 = "50";
String string3 = "20";

int number1 = Integer.decode(string1);
int number2 = Integer.decode(string2); 
int number3 = Integer.decode(string3); 

System.out.println("Parsing String \"" + string1 + "\": " + number2);
System.out.println("Parsing String \"" + string2 + "\": " + number2);
System.out.println("Parsing String \"" + string3 + "\": " + number3);

Running this piece of code will yield:

Parsing String "100": 50
Parsing String "50": 50
Parsing String "20": 20

Conclusion

We've covered one of the fundamental topics of Java and common problem developers face - Converting a String to an Integer or int using tools shipped with the JDK.

Last Updated: April 24th, 2020
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